Fleece!

In exchange for helping, I was given the fleece.  We started setting up at 8:00 a.m.; we finished at 7:30 p.m..  It was a long hard day, but that always feels good to me.  And it is good working with a good crew.  We caught and wrestled 50 ewes into the shearing pen, and did general go-for support work.  Then on the way home I had to take a cicuitous route home due to a strong, localized thunderstorm cell that blocked my direct return (rain, which we desperately needed).  The fleeces grew and grew in the back of my pickup as the day progressed.  All of them fit in the end with a tarp tied over them.  Storing them will come later today…

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Wool Storage

It’s not much to look at.  It’s not galvanized…but it is steel.  It’s got holes, but they can be plugged.  It’s free.  And it needs to be cleaned up.  And it will work well for wool storage.  It’s just the start of shopping around for several of these.  And I am humbled and even grateful that I can reuse something that is seemingly potentially just clutter in someone’s bush line.  Today I was asked by my neighbour if I was available to help sheer his sheep, and to take his wool away in the near future.  I said, You betcha!

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Storing Wool

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Yesterday I realized that my Farmec 181 grain hopper box would make a perfect storage bin for wool.  It is roughly 120 cubic feet/100 bushels…10 feet long and 6 feet across.  I scoured it out…

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Today I cut a plywood top, painted it, attached sides as a way to secure it and protect against water infiltration. I sealed all openings with silicone.  I transferred all wool into it.  Then I covered the wool with a plastic sheet which overhung the bin.  The top was set in place.  I then placed another plastic sheet over the top and tied this all down with a tarp.  It is insect-proof and water-tight.  I may add a screen on one end and a small fan at the other for aeration in the future.

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I will look for other hopper bins that are for sale for reasonable prices…

Wee Peggy by Rappart, New Zealand

The Wee Peggy was a New Zealand kit set built by Rappard. This one was bought and assembled in 1982. Serial #?79781.  It is of the Shetland variety of wheels.

Recently Ashford has produced a version of the Wee Peggy, which retails today for between $700 – $800 CDN. I bought this one for $50 and refinished it.  It was extremely well cared for by its previous owner.  I disassembled it as I could, then I lightly sanded and steel wooled it.  I used boiled linseed oil as a finish; the wood was very thirsty. It came out beautifully.  It is in perfect shape.  I really can’t wait to learn how to use it.

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A fine website on NZ spinning wheels is here:

http://www.nzspinningwheels.info

The items relevant to the Wee Peggy are as follows:

http://www.nzspinningwheels.info/rappard.html

http://users.actrix.co.nz/fbmoknox//comparepeggy/peggycomparison.html

http://www.ashford.co.nz/newsite/images/stories/PDF_aguides/weepeggy.pdf

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We will be looking for another wheel, but there is no rush…