Draper Model D Loom

We purchased this fully functioning Draper Model D power loom on Sunday, March 27, from this couple who used it in their business near Lancaster, PA, USA…

DSC00020

We broke it down into the castle and base…

DSC00141

DSC00144

We loaded it on Monday March 28 and started our 2,200 mile trip home at 2 p.m..  We arrived home on Wednesday, March 30, at 5 p.m., driving straight through.  It was a 51 hour drive home…

DSC00149

As much as we are pleased with the purchase of our power loom, handweaving is still most important to us.  This blog is reserved for hand weaving.  You may follow our power loom weaving at: https://drapermodeld.wordpress.com.

 

Advertisements

Building A 45″ Raddle

Today I put together a raddle for my 45″ floor looms.  Our local cabinet shop had a 48″ long, 2″ x 2″ piece of clear maple.  My total cost was $28.00…list price for a Leclerc is $70…

DSC00031

I ripped the board in half, lengthwise – 2, 1″ x 2″ boards – and planed them.  Then I lightly penciled a line with a square down the entire length of the board and hash marked it at 1/2″ intervals.  I dimpled these hash marks with a nail.  I added a fence to my drill press and drilled out the holes that are a little smaller than the 3″ common nails.  The wood is not drilled all the way through…

DSC00032

Cutting off the heads of the nails the remaining stubs are sanded and smoothed.   The nails are lightly hammered into place.  The opposing block of wood is drilled with holes twice as large as the nails to ease fitting.  And the raddle is given its first treatment with boiled linseed oil…

DSC00035

The finished raddle…

DSC00034

Mahatma Gandhi Visits Lancashire Textile Mills

As a part of the Indian Independence Movement Mahatmas Gandhi advocated not buying British textiles in favour of their own homespun fabric in a effort to break the hold of empire on the people who were paid a pittance for the raw materials they produced – cotton and dye – and then were expected to buy back British textiles at prices prescribed by empire.  Gandhi lovingly advocated the pride that accompanies good work done on your own behalf among the peoples of India.  In 1931, while on a working trip to England to discuss Indian independence, Gandhi was invited to visit the British mills in a governmental bid to demonstrate to him the plight of the British mill workers at having the textile industry being depressed by India’s actions.  Gandhi simply said, ‘I love these people as my own children,’ of which he was misquoted, and which he promptly corrected, and which left his host laughing with embarrassment at not knowing what to say to such a human and direct address.  One hundred years on love yet remains a stymying proposition among narcissists, psychopaths, empire, industry, and corporations.  Handweaving is truly a most humanizing, connected action…